About

About In(ter)ventions
In(ter)ventions is a platform for discussion set up in 2014 by two Collaborative Doctoral Award students based at the British Museum, Naomi Lebens and Felicity Roberts.

Playing card from the Cartes des Rois de France, Stefano della Bella and Jean Desmarets, 1644.  BM 1871,0513.452

Playing card from the Cartes des Rois de France, Stefano della Bella and Jean Desmarets, 1644. BM 1871,0513.452

It grew out of conversations they were having about conducting academic object-led research within a museum environment. Research complicates objects. Often, it reveals chequered histories and it can disrupt the conventional picture of an object’s significance. But how do/should museums respond to fluid object identities? And how does the museum itself continue to create new meaning for its collections? The first of the events they are organising is a one-day workshop, taking place in February 2015, in which they hope to further develop and refine these conversations.

About the organisers
Naomi Lebens is a PhD student based at the Courtauld Institute of Art and the British Museum, working in the Museum’s Prints and Drawings department on its collection of early modern printed games.  Many of these playful prints have been repurposed, for example four packs of playing cards produced to teach the young King Louis XIV were successively republished as a book, a collector’s object, and a different type of game.

A view from the south of the British Museum's Enlightenment Gallery (Room 1), where many of Sloane's objects are displayed in their historical context.

A view from the south of the British Museum’s Enlightenment Gallery (Room 1), where many of Sloane’s objects are displayed in their historical context.

Felicity Roberts is a PhD student based at King’s College London and the British Museum, researching the collection of the eighteenth-century physician and naturalist Sir Hans Sloane (1660-1753). This is one of the foundational collections of the British Museum, and has undergone many transformations since its accession in 1753, each of which have affected how the collection is understood and used by curators, researchers and visitors alike.

About the cover image
A group of 181 early eighteenth-century playing cards in which the backs of the cards have been printed with amusing questions and answers for use in another game.
Playing cards, anonymous (French), hand-coloured woodcut and letterpress, c.1725, each card c.83 x 55 mm.
BM PD 1876,1014.895-1080.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s